Assistance needed for a constipated newborn kitten

I recently took in an abandoned kitten my dad found outside his home. He had been alone for several days before I got him. It’s now the third day since I’ve had him, and overall, he seems healthy except for his constipation issues. His stools are unusually hard for a kitten, and he appears to be in discomfort when trying to pass them. It’s taking a long time for him to defecate, and I’ve already adjusted his diet to include more water, following advice from other cat fosterers. However, he’s still experiencing pain. Is there anything else I can do to help him pass stools more easily? I’m really concerned about his well-being.

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Since he’s so young, it could be worthwhile to take him in for a checkup and seek some professional advice on the problem from a veterinarian.

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When we brought home our kitten (a bit older than yours, but younger than what the breeder had indicated), we faced a similar challenge. The best course of action is to visit the vet; they can likely prescribe a stool softener. Avoid trying any home remedies from the internet, as they are often intended for older cats and can be more harmful than helpful. It’s important to address this promptly because kittens with this issue can become hesitant to defecate, worsening the problem and starting a harmful cycle.

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We faced this issue with our five-day-old abandoned kittens. It’s a bit unpleasant, but you can purchase glycerin suppositories made for infants at a drugstore. Cut off the tip of the suppository, then carefully cut it lengthwise into quarters. After the kitten has urinated, insert one quarter into its rectum. This should quickly resolve the constipation (though it’s not the most pleasant task). It’s crucial to act promptly, as constipation in very young kittens should be addressed within a week, ideally with veterinary assistance.

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Are you feeding him KMR kitten milk or an equivalent? If not, that’s what he needs to be eating.

Additionally, after he eats, gently use a damp washcloth or small rag to massage his bum in circular motions to help him with bowel movements.

It might also be a good idea to contact a vet to check if he may have ingested something before he was found that could be causing this issue.